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Symptoms of Lupus, Silicone Breast Implant Lawyers

Written by lisaspitzer on . Posted in Breast Implant Blog

Breast Implant lawyers are helping women with silicone disease claims and proof of disease claims such as Lupus. Many women have developed immune disorders and silicone toxicity diseases from silicone entiring their bloodstream and into their body from leaking and ruptured breast implants.

Information from womenshealth.gov

    Autoimmune diseases  such as Lupus are a part of the breast implant class action disease claims.

What is lupus?

Lupus (LOO-puhss) is a chronic, autoimmune (aw-toh-ih-MYOON) disease. It can damage any part of the body (skin, joints, and/or organs inside the body). Chronic means that the signs and symptoms tend to last longer than six weeks and often for many years. In lupus, something goes wrong with your immune system, which is the part of the body that fights off viruses, bacteria, and other germs ("foreign invaders," like the flu). Normally your immune system produces proteins called antibodies that protect the body from these invaders. Autoimmune means your immune system cannot tell the difference between these invaders and your body's healthy tissues ("auto" means "self"). In lupus, your immune system creates autoantibodies (AW-toh-AN-teye-bah-deez), which sometimes attack and destroy healthy tissue. These autoantibodies contribute to inflammation, pain, and damage in various parts of the body.

When people talk about "lupus," they usually mean systemic lupus erythematosus (ur-uh-thee-muh-TOH-suhss), or SLE. This is the most common type of lupus. It is hard to guess how many people in the U.S. have lupus, because the symptoms are so different for every person. Sometimes is not diagnosed. The Lupus Foundation of America thinks that about 16,000 new cases are reported across the country each year.

Although lupus can affect almost any organ system, the disease, for most people, affects only a few parts of the body. For example, one person with lupus may have swollen knees and fever. Another person may be tired all the time or have kidney trouble. Someone else may have rashes. Over time, more symptoms can develop.

Normally, lupus develops slowly, with symptoms that come and go. Women who get lupus most often have symptoms and are diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 45. But the disease also can happen in childhood or later in life.

For some people, lupus is a mild disease. But for others, it may cause severe problems. Even if your lupus symptoms are mild, it is a serious disease that needs constant monitoring and treatment. It can harm your organs and put your life at risk if untreated.

Although the term “lupus” commonly refers to SLE, there are several kinds of lupus:

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE, makes up about 70 percent of all cases of lupus. SLE can be mild or severe and can affect various parts of the body. Common symptoms include fatigue, hair loss, sensitivity to the sun (photosensitivity), painful and swollen joints, unexplained fever, skin rashes, and kidney problems. In general the diagnosis of lupus is based off of a combination of physical symptoms and laboratory results.
    Cutaneous (kyoo-TAY-nee-uhss) lupus erythematosus can be limited to the skin or seen in those with SLE. “Cutaneous” means “skin.” Symptoms may include rashes/lesions, hair loss, vasculitis (swelling of the blood vessels), ulcers, and photosensitivity. A doctor will remove a small piece of the rash or sore and look at it under a microscope to tell if someone has skin lupus and what form it is. There are two major kinds of cutaneous lupus:
        Discoid (DISS-koid) lupus erythematosus, also called DLE, mainly affects the skin. The discoid rash usually begins as a red raised rash that becomes scaly or changes color to a dark brown. These rashes often appear on the skin on the face and scalp, but other areas may also be affected. Many people with DLE have scarring. Sometimes DLE causes sores in the mouth or nose. A doctor will remove a small piece of the rash or sore and look at it under a microscope to tell if someone has DLE. If you have DLE, there is a small chance that you will later get SLE. Currently there is no way to know if someone with DLE will get SLE.
        Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus makes up 10 percent of lupus cases. About 50 percent of the time, people with subacute cutaneous lupus also have SLE. Subacute cutaneous lupus causes skin lesions that appear on parts of the body exposed to sun. These lesions do not cause scars.
 

 Lupus can cause these diseases to occur earlier in life:

    Heart disease. When you have lupus you are at bigger risk of the main type of heart disease, called coronary artery disease (CAD). This is partly because people with lupus have more CAD risk factors, which may include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes. The inflammation that accompanies lupus also increases the risk of developing CAD. Women with lupus are often less active because of fatigue, joint problems, and/or muscle pain, and this also puts them at risk. Heart disease is the number one killer of all women. But, women with lupus are 50 times more likely to have chest pain or a heart attack than other women of the same age.
    Osteoporosis (OSS-tee-oh-puh-ROH-suhss). Women with lupus have more bone loss and broken bones than other women. This might be because some medicines used to treat lupus cause bone loss. The disease itself can also cause bone loss. Also, pain and fatigue can keep women with lupus from exercising. Staying active is important for keeping bones healthy and strong.
    Kidney disease. Many symptoms of lupus come from the swelling of organs in the body. Almost half of all people with lupus develop kidney problems, called lupus nephritis. Kidney problems often begin within the first five years after lupus symptoms start to appear. This is one of the more serious complications of lupus, but there are treatments if problems are caught early. However, it is important to know that kidney inflammation is not painful and you can’t feel it. That is why it's important for people with lupus to keep up-to-date with the screenings their doctors recommend. These will include urine and blood tests.

Common signs of lupus are:

  •     Joint pain and stiffness, with or without swelling
  •     Muscle aches, pains, or weakness
  •     Fever with no known cause
  •     Feeling very tired
  •     Butterfly-shaped rash across the nose and cheeks
  •     Other skin rashes
  •     Unusual weight loss or weight gain
  •     Anemia (uh-NEE-me-uh) (too few red blood cells)
  •     Trouble thinking, memory problems, confusion
  •     Kidney problems with no known cause
  •     Chest pain when taking a deep breath
  •     Sun or light sensitivity
  •     Hair loss
  •     Purple or pale fingers or toes from cold or stress

Less common symptoms include:

  •     Blood clots
  •     Seizures
  •     Sores in the mouth or nose (usually painless)
  •     Severe headache
  •     Dizzy spells
  •     "Seeing things", not able to judge reality
  •     Feeling sad
  •     Strokes
  •     Dry or irritated eyes

If you hav a registered claim with on of the Silicone breast implant class action facilities and have Lupus contact the Breast Implant helpline to speak to a breast Implant Lawyer and find out if you have a claim.

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